Neutering….. should I or shouldn’t I do it to my dog?

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Neutering….. should I or shouldn’t I do it to my dog?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rio 11 months


Continuing the story of Rio…. He had his neutering or castration operation last week so I know exactly how our owners feel when they drop their little one off on the morning of their operation.

It’s an emotional time worrying if they are going to be ok and if you have made the right decision in putting them through it.

Here at Ashley Vets we believe that for most pets it is the right thing to do however all our pets are individuals so we are more than happy to discuss the pros and cons and the timing of the operation and we will respect any decision you make for your pet.

For Rio, I opted to wait until he was a little more mature but we can castrate male dogs from 6 months old. This often catches them before they become too ‘randy’ so for many families it is a good decision to go ahead at this time.

There are good medical reasons for neutering.

For the boys it prevents

  • Testicular tumours
  • Prostate issues
  • Anal ademonas (tumours around the anus)

As well as of course reducing sexually motivated behaviours, male to male aggression and roaming.

For the girls it prevents

  • Unwanted pregnancy
  • Pyometra (an infection in the uterus)
  • Greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumours

As well as not having the practical inconvenience of regular seasons and hormonal changes.

The operation is carried out here at the practice as a day procedure.

Your little one will need to be starved on the morning of the operation because they will be having a general anaesthetic.

They will be admitted to the hospital and given a thorough check over before a pre-med sedative is given. A blood sample may be taken at this time if you have requested it to check that their internal organs are working correctly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rio feeling sleepy after his sedative

Once the sedative has taken effect, they will be placed under general anaesthetic in our theatre and a tube will be placed down their throat. They will be monitored at all times by the veterinary nurse while the vet is performing the surgery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rio under general anaesthetic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rio was constantly monitored while under the anaesthetic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The surgery to remove his testicles

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stitching up the wound

Once the surgery is complete they will recover in a cosy kennel and will be monitored by our team of nurses and animal care assistants until they are fully awake.

They will of course be given pain killers to keep them as comfortable as possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuddles with Robyn once the surgery is over

They will be ready to go home on the same day by late afternoon and they will have a wound with some stitches in it which stay in place for approximately 10 days. During that time, they will need a little more TLC at home than normal and will need to be rested and stopped from licking their wound.

We will see them back for a check-up which is usually 5 and 10 days after surgery.

Rio was feeling much better by the day after his surgery and his wound is now fully healed and the whole experience hasn’t put him off coming to work with me!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rio snoozing happily under my desk while I work.

If you want to have a chat about neutering your pet please give us a ring on 0141 959 6100 or arrange to come in for a free appointment with Robyn our veterinary nurse so that you can discuss the details and she can answer any questions for you.

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